Tuesday, 6 September 2011

Greatcoat - pattern research

I am now well into researching a pattern for my Green Greatcoat.

Some of you may recall that I found a Cutters Guide from the 1890s (see right), which contained instructions on the construction of a basic lounge jacket block.

This has severed me very well, and was the basis for both the Ultimate Tennant Suit AND the recent Shetland and Donegal Tweed jackets I have made.

Well, I have now found a much later (1949) Cutter’s Guide which covers  a number of garment disciplines, from clerical to court; from Scottish to garments for the tropics! (see left)

But of particular interest is a section regarding British Navy, Army and Air Force uniforms and greatcoats, including the instructions for how to cut them!

THIS is what I will use to create a basic pattern from which I can extract what I need and adapt to create the Green Greatcoat design.

Below is a list of the patterns in the book which are of interest to me, some more than others, but here they all are.

Navy
Bridge Coat or Greatcoat

This is a double-breasted, with six buttons on each side, the lower four for fastening. A distinctive line of double stitch underlies the button line.

There is an old fashioned sword slit in the side underarm dart just above a straight flapped pocket.


The back has an inverted box pleat with a buttoned vent below, secured with a triangular tack - not unlike the Tennant Coat. It is further pulled in by a half-belt.
Official length is to 14 inches from the ground.

Watch Coat or Naval Warm Coat

Again double-breasted with four buttons for fastening and an addition one above for crossing the lapel to the neck.

There is an old fashioned sword slit in the side underarm dart just above a straight flapped pocket.

The back is a simple centre seam, with a vent below.
Official length is to just below the knee.
Air Force
Greatcoat

This is of special interest to the Captain Jack fans, as this is the basic design of the coat he wears, abet with some modifications.
It is double-breasted, fastened with five buttons on each side and a broad lapel and collar.

There is an old fashioned sword slit in the side underarm dart just above an inclined flapped pocket.

The back has an inverted box pleat with a buttoned vent below, secured with a triangular tack - again not unlike the Tennant Coat. It is further pulled in by a half-belt.

Special instructions on how this pleat is arranged are included in the book, which makes for complicated reading.
Official length is to 14 inches from the ground.


Army
No1 Greatcoat

Double-breasted as usual, in a lancer style with just four buttons right running to the top of the lapel.
A sword slit is in the underarm seam, leading down to an inclined flapped pocket.

The back seam has a more conservative inverted box pleat from neck to waist. The vent below is from below the seat to hem and again to a more simplistic style. The shaping of the back is completed by a two-part half-belt, pulling in 2.5 inches.


Greatcoat - Alternative Model

This design is described as not being strictly regulation, but often requested.
It is double-breasted with a two-way collar fastened with four buttons on each side.

There is an old fashioned sword slit in the side underarm dart just above an inclined flapped pocket.
The back has a centre seam to just below the seat, and a vent to the hem. Official length is to 14 inches from the ground.
British Warm

This is a more relaxed coat, with a double-breasted front, fastened with three leather buttons on each side (as opposed to the brass buttons of all the previous coats).

It has a sword slit as the greatcoat, just above a straight flapped side pocket, plus an optional welted breast pocket.
Length is cut to just below the knee.

It is this final coat that will give me the best basic block from which I can work. It will need to be heavily modified, but nothing I can’t handle.
The first thing I will have to do is draft the block, based on my own measurements, and make a quick calico to check out the fit and sizing.

Check back soon to see how I’m getting along.

3 comments:

  1. Impressive research as always Steve. I guess we are assuming that Matt's green coat was another bespoke item like the boots?

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  2. Steve, I dunno if you've seen this yet, but I suppose other Who fans would be interested as well:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFy06YYzNCo

    It features Matt prancing about in his new coat and showing off some of its details.

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  3. I have one of these coats i brought it for £74 pounds tell me is it burberrys

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